Manage the energy for successful meetings

Successful meetings, workshops, and even smaller group discussions rely on creating and managing the right energy. A meeting where everyone has low energy will feel long and boring, whereas a small group discussion with too much high-energy can feel like an argument waiting to happen. 

Experienced workshop designers will know that scheduling breaks at the right time is important, as is the essential “after lunch energiser” to get people engaged again. Meetings and work discussions are no different. 

Finding ways to generate energy is an important part of a successful meeting. A couple of minutes of light-hearted chit-chat as people get settled can help set the tone (if appropriate for the meeting content). If the meeting is mostly about relaying content then it can be easy to rely on powerpoint presentations but finding a way to incorporate physical items such as paper cut outs, or port-it notes can be very effective at engaging the audience. Simple tasks such as grouping statements on bits of paper instead of reading them a list, or asking for agenda items to be written on post-its rather than typed into a document can make the meeting feel collaborative and energising. 

Movement is another great way to generate energy. Having people stand up and move around completely changes the energy in the room and can serve as an excellent switch between stages of a meeting or workshop. Workstations where attendees move around to focus on smaller topics or tasks are fun and help keep people engaged, but even something simple like standing up to stick a post-it note on a wall can be enough to get people focused. Movement can be an effective way to break people away from laptop distractions too, something which can be a big culprit in sucking energy from the room. 

Spending time sitting and writing will reduce the energy and also give people time to think and reflect. I’m a big fan of having people sit in silence for a set amount of time, for example silently writing topic suggestions for 5 minutes at the beginning of the meeting to encourage deeper thinking. In “Time to Think” Nancy Kline writes about the importance of giving people space to think, but also the power of them knowing they won’t be interrupted for a set amount of time, freeing them up to really think. 

Not everyone can think on the spot, and not everyone will be comfortable speaking up in front of a crowd so mixing up the meeting formats can help different people engage in a way that suits them. Having time to prepare and then choose what I’m comfortable sharing is a much kinder way to encourage engagement than putting someone on the spot in a meeting. Sharing the meeting format in advance can give even more time for participants to plan their contribution. 

Bringing groups of people together can have unpredictable results and learning to redirect energy is essential facilitation tool. It can be hard to know in advance that energy will need to be managed but signs such as an unresolved discussion, or lack of actionable outcomes can be good indicators. When discussions becomes heated they can get stuck in a head-to-head energy battle that is difficult to resolve. Re-directing this energy into a different form can really help move things along. Whiteboards, or post it notes for example, can be a new focus for the energy, even a simple request such as “can you sketch that out for me on the board” can help to move the discussion along in a low-conflict way. 

Creating meetings that include both movement and deep thinking can lead to thoughtful discussions with energised attendees. Keeping people engaged and knowing how to resolve deadlocks will lead to more enjoyable, and effective meetings. Try introducing one change with the intention of shifting the energy in your meeting and see whether you see an impact.